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Maria-Hinojosa

Maria Hinojosa

Emmy-Winning Journalist

For 25 years, Maria Hinojosa has helped tell America’s untold stories and brought to light unsung heroes in America and abroad. In April 2010, Hinojosa launched The Futuro Media Group with the mission to produce multi-platform, community-based journalism that gives critical voice to the voiceless by harnessing the power of independent media to tell stories…

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For 25 years, Maria Hinojosa has helped tell America’s untold stories and brought to light unsung heroes in America and abroad. In April 2010, Hinojosa launched The Futuro Media Group with the mission to produce multi-platform, community-based journalism that gives critical voice to the voiceless by harnessing the power of independent media to tell stories that are overlooked or under reported by traditional media.

As the anchor and executive producer of the long-running weekly NPR show Latino USA, and as anchor of the Emmy Award-winning talk show Maria Hinojosa: One-on-One from WGBH/La Plaza, Hinojosa has informed millions of Americans about the fastest growing group in our country. Previously, a Senior Correspondent for NOW on PBS, and currently, a rotating anchor for Need to Know, Hinojosa has reported hundreds of important stories—from the immigrant work camps in NOLA after Katrina, to teen girl victims of sexual harassment on the job, to Emmy Award-winning stories of the poor in Alabama.

Hinojosa has won top honors in American journalism. Latino USA won a Peabody Award in April 2015 for its 2014 episode “Gangs, Murder and Migration in Honduras.” Her awards also include four Emmys, the 2012 John Chancellor Award for Excellence in Journalism, the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Reporting on the Disadvantaged, the Studs Terkel Community Media Award, and the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Overseas Press Club for best documentary for her groundbreaking “Child Brides: Stolen Lives.” In 2009, Hinojosa was honored with an AWRT Gracie Award for Individual Achievement as Best TV correspondent.

In 2010 she was awarded an honorary degree, Doctor of Humane Letters, by DePaul University in Chicago, as well as the Sidney Hillman Prize honoring her social and economic justice reporting. In 2012 she additionally received an honorary degree from Simmons College, was named among the top 25 Latinos in Contemporary American Culture by the Huffington Post, and gave the prestigious Ware Lecture. In 2013, Hinojosa taught at DePaul University as the Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz chair of the Latin American and Latino Studies program.

Throughout her career, Hinojosa has helped define the conversation about our times and our society with one of the most authentic voices in broadcast. Hinojosa is the author of two books including a motherhood memoir, Raising Raul: Adventures Raising Myself and My Son. She was born in Mexico City, raised in Chicago, and received her BA from Barnard College.

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Frontlines: Latinos & Immigration from a Woman’s Perspective
One of the most prominent Latina journalists in our country, Maria Hinojosa has been covering major stories for over 20 years. In this insightful and engaging presentation, she speaks about her experiences covering immigration for NPR and PBS. As a woman and a mother, she has a particular interest in how immigration is impacting the mental health of Latinas and their families. She also speaks about how Latinos and Latinas are now the new face of the civil rights movement in our country.

Latinos in the Media
Latinos are the fastest growing demographic in our country, but the growth in numbers brings many challenges. Award-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa talks about a phenomenon she calls “The US Mambo—Three Steps Forward, Two Steps Back.” For example, while Latinos represent a trillion dollar consumer market, more Latinos have been deported than at any other time in history. While Sofia Vergara is the highest paid actress on TV, Latina teens have the highest rate of attempted suicide in the US. And while the number of Latino high school students taking the ACTs grew by 90 percent in the last five years, the city of Syracuse has a Latino dropout rate of 65 percent. The losers in this equation are not all Latinos: given the future of this country will be increasingly Latino, what happens to this population will have a direct impact on the future of this country. This has to matter to all of us.

A Critical Look at the Media in a Post 9/11 Reality

A Leading Latina on “Owning Your Voice”

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Voices of Courage Luncheon 2012 - Maria Hinojosa

From invisible to visible - Maria Hinojosa

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